Study of Perspective

AiWhiteHouse

Aiweiwei study of perspective tiananmen 1997 600x450

Weiwei Study of Perspective San Marco 1995 2003 600x390

AiMonaLisa

AiEiffel

Ai Weiwei work from Study of Perspective:

“…Each picture show the artist’s hand making a one-finger gesture, again rude, at a variety of places familiar and unfamiliar. The equal-opportunity dissing encompasses power sites like Tiananmen Square and the White House, but also, intriguingly, Long Island City, Queens. Together with the history-infused sculpture, the antic pictures give a sense of the versatility of an artist whose role has been the stimulating, mold-breaking one of scholar-clown.”

Holland Cotter for the New York Times

[via i like this art]

HTML11

The mission of the HTML11 is to fulfill the promise of XML for applying HTML11 to a wide variety of platforms with proper attention paid to internationalization, accessibility, device-independence, usability and life structuring.

(via Nerdcore)

Alterations

Afdruk01 600x445

Works by Jasper Elings:

“…With sources originating from digital readymades or appropriated video, each artist modifies, redirects and redistributes the footage using a wide array of alterations, from simple editing to more detailed and complex reconstructions. The digital realm casts a dark shadow over the initial intent of images and our preconceptions of their meaning and usage into a new alternative mode of existence where the source becomes either a catalyst or an added layer of a whole new work.”

(via i like this art)

Ownership becomes a burden

“From cars to CDs, houses to handbags, people are no longer aspiring to own. Belongings which used to be the standard by which to measure personal success, status, and security are increasingly being borrowed, traded, swapped, or simply left on the shelf. Various factors – arguably the most important being an increasingly connected and digitally networked society, regardless of economic development – are causing revolutionary global shifts in behavior. As quickly as a new laptop becomes yesterday’s technology in a brittle plastic shell, or a power tool idly collects dust in the garage, it seems that material possessions are changing from treasure into junk, from security into liability, from freedom into burden, and from personal to communal.”

read more here

Replaced Mona Lisa

Replaced Mona Lisa is a work by Mike Ruiz:

“The Mona Lisa with the lady selected then put through Content-Aware Fill (a Photoshop CS5 tool that automatically generates content based on the existing surrounding content of the image and fills in selected area). The resulting image is a potential landscape as interpreted by the software. The image was sent to an painting manufacturer in China where an oil painting was produced.”

David Foster Wallaces self-help library

Postcard

 

A portion of David Foster Wallace’s personal library now resides at the Ransom Center at the University of Texas at Austin. Maria Bustillos visited the Center and discovered clues to Wallace’s depression scribbled in the margins of several self-help books the writer owned and very carefully read

One surprise was the number of popular self-help books in the collection, and the care and attention with which he read and reread them. I mean stuff of the best-sellingest, Oprah-level cheesiness and la-la reputation was to be found in Wallace’s library. Along with all the Wittgenstein, Husserl and Borges, he read John Bradshaw, Willard Beecher, Neil Fiore, Andrew Weil, M. Scott Peck and Alice Miller. Carefully.

Much of Wallace’s work has to do with cutting himself back down to size, and in a larger sense, with the idea that cutting oneself back down to size is a good one, for anyone (q.v., the Kenyon College commencement speech, later published as This is Water). I left the Ransom Center wondering whether one of the most valuable parts of Wallace’s legacy might not be in persuading us to put John Bradshaw on the same level with Wittgenstein. And why not; both authors are human beings who set out to be of some use to their fellows. It can be argued, in fact, that getting rid of the whole idea of special gifts, of the exceptional, and of genius, is the most powerful current running through all of Wallace’s work.

(Via kottke.org)

Be Your Own Souvenir

Be Your Own Souvenir project by Blablabla:

“This proposal aims to connect street users, arts and science, linking them to under-laying spaces and their own realities. The installation was enjoyed during two weekends in January 2011 by the tourists, neighbours of La Rambla and citizens of Barcelona, a city that faces a trade-off between identity and gentrification, economic sustainability and economic growth.

This shapes through a technological ritual where the audience is released from established roles in a perspective exchange: spectator-performer, artist-tourist, observer-object. 

The user becomes the producer as well as the consumer through a system that invites him/her to perform as a human statue, with a free personal souvenir as a reward: a small figure of him/herself printed three-dimensionally from a volumetric reconstruction of the person generated by the use of three structured light scanners (kinect).

The project mimics the informal artistic context of this popular street, human sculptures and craftsmen, bringing diverse realities and enabling greater empathy between the agents that cohabit in the public space.”

(Via iGNANT)

Souvenir 06

Souvenir 07

Augmented Photography

Augmented Photography is a project by Varvara Guljajeva:

“When it is spoken about interactive or augmented photography then immediately one has in mind the representation of photos in digital format (on computer or phone screen, projection, etc) that are manipulated through software or any other code. Yes, the interactive pictures can react on our touch, voice, weather, or whatever. But those interactive photos are still just pixels.

My artwork – Augmented Photography – is not about pixels. It is about re-thinking printed photography. Current artwork is more than a framed picture – it has its behavior and it is able to react on observers.

I am adding liveliness to a doll on the picture through eye movements. If none is looking at the picture the doll’s eyes are closed. Only time-to-time, she is waking up and asking for attention. When the photograph is approached, the doll on the picture opens her eyes and starts to blink to a viewer or just stare on him/her for a while. Hence, the artwork has different behaviors that could be explored by observing the picture for a while.”