American Pixels

Colberg1

Colberg2
“American Pixels’ series is a pixel experiment created by Jörg M. Colberg in (2009 – 2010).
‘Image formats like jpeg (or gif) use compression algorithms to save space, while trying to retain a large fraction of the original information. A computer that creates a jpeg does not know anything about the contents of the image: It does what it is told, in a uniform manner across the image.”

(via TRIANGULATION BLOG)

How to Stop Worrying and Learn to Love the Internet

This article was written by Douglas Adams in 1999, and it still stands as one of the best things written on the subject. Required reading. A couple of quotes:

So people complain that there’s a lot of rubbish online, or that it’s dominated by Americans, or that you can’t necessarily trust what you read on the web. Imagine trying to apply any of those criticisms to what you hear on the telephone. Of course you can’t ‘trust’ what people tell you on the web anymore than you can ‘trust’ what people tell you on megaphones, postcards or in restaurants. Working out the social politics of who you can trust and why is, quite literally, what a very large part of our brain has evolved to do. For some batty reason we turn off this natural scepticism when we see things in any medium which require a lot of work or resources to work in, or in which we can’t easily answer back — like newspapers, television or granite. Hence ‘carved in stone.’
What should concern us is not that we can’t take what we read on the internet on trust — of course you can’t, it’s just people talking — but that we ever got into the dangerous habit of believing what we read in the newspapers or saw on the TV — a mistake that no one who has met an actual journalist would ever make. One of the most important things you learn from the internet is that there is no ‘them’ out there. It’s just an awful lot of ‘us’…”

“Interactivity. Many-to-many communications. Pervasive networking. These are cumbersome new terms for elements in our lives so fundamental that, before we lost them, we didn’t even know to have names for them.”


Personal Internet Cache Archive

Personal Internet Cache Archive is a project by Evan Roth:

“Internet cache: “a mechanism for the temporary storage of web documents” (Wikipedia)

An ongoing study of archived images collected passively through my everyday Internet usage. Internet cache is visualized using off the shelf screen saver and image viewing software to produce archival prints and videos. Each print is a unique archive of cached images from a specific date.”

You think it’s your bandwidth…

Yung Jake singing about datamoshing and making animated gifs…

“you think it’s connection you think it’s your bandwidth
but its me. i’ll steal your bitch like a bandit
see me on YouTube. fucking with video
find me on world star. find me on Vimeo
im not on PhotoBooth. that shit’s different
cuz dey told me to step out of the frame but i didnt”

[via kottke]

META Assassins

META Assassins, a tournament-based assassination game, makes use of a downloadable plugin to detect browser activity and, in turn, triggers shootouts when your assigned ‘target’ lands on the same page. This concept game also features real jobs, like Streetview Surveillance and Dead Drops, where real drops are placed in your city for a fellow player to retrieve in exchange for game cash.”

(via Lost At E Minor: For creative people)