Time portraits

Time-lapse portraits layered and cut to reveal the passage of time, by Nerhol:

“The numerous portraits are actually different, photographed over a period of three minutes as the subject tried to sit motionless, the idea being that it’s impossible to ever truly be still as our center of gravity shifts and our muscles are tense. The portraits are actually a layered lime-lapse representing several minutes in the subjects life and then cut like an onion to show slices of time, similar to the trunk of a tree.”

[via colossal]

Art in the Era of the Internet

“The internet has intensified connections between people across the planet. In this episode we take a look at the impact of this new interconnectivity on the art world. Traditional funding models are dissolving, new forms of expressing ownership have arisen to accomodate for remix culture, and artists are finding ways to connect physical art experiences and traditions to the internet. In the digital era, the experience of art from the perspective of the artist and the art audience is shifting rapidly, and bringing more people into the creative process. “

The Twitter version of Marclay’s The Clock

“Nearly every second, a user on Twitter tweets about what time it is. It could be groaning about waking up, to telling a friend when to meet, to an automated train scheduler altering when the next one is coming. By searching Twitter for the current time we get a tiny glimpse of how active and far reaching the social network is.”

Actually, Chirp Clock makes much more sense that The Clock, a dull, overrated work that manages to impress us only for the giant amount of work and money necessary to make it (it’s really fun to watch, though).

[via kottke]

Blitz

Blitz, a performance by Marcello Maloberti for MACRO (Museum of Contemporary Art Rome).

The Curator’s Code

“While we have systems in place for literary citation, image attribution, and scientific reference, we don’t yet have a system that codifies the attribution of discovery in curation as a currency of the information economy, a system that treats discovery as the creative labor that it is. This is what The Curator’s Code is – a system for honoring the creative and intellectual labor of information discovery by making attribution consistent and codified, the celebrated norm.”

ᔥ Brain Pickings

Animated GIFs: The Birth of a Medium

“GIFs are one of the oldest image formats used on the web. Throughout their history, they have served a huge variety of purposes, from functional to entertainment. Now, 25 years after the first GIF was created, they are experiencing an explosion of interest and innovation that is pushing them into the terrain of art. In this episode of Off Book, we chart their history, explore the hotbed of GIF creativity on Tumblr, and talk to two teams of GIF artists who are evolving the form into powerful new visual experiences.”

Another great video by PBS Off Book series.

Punishment

Punishment is a new series of works by Julius von Bismarck:

“The title of the exhibition points to a pre-Christian legend that says that the Achaemenid King and Egyptian Pharaoh Xerxes had the strait at Hellespont punished with 300 lashes, after bridges that had been built on his order were destroyed by a storm shortly after construction.
Julius von Bismarck took up this anger allegorically for his new series of works. From October to December 2011 he went on a journey through Switzerland, South America and the United States armed with a whip.  At impressive locations he plays with the rhetorical power of this traditional retaliation, whipping nature, defying its power, until he is exhausted. In a contemporary context, he thus rebels against socialization and, as a modern Sisyphus, questions value patterns which are conveyed to people today by societal constructs and authorities.”

Part time virus hunters

“Overly melodramatic and cheesy Boston TV channel news report about a computer virus outbreak discovered by MIT nerds in 1998. Fun because they don’t just report on the virus – they interview geeks, and insert random clips from retro videogames and TV movies to illustrate what a virus is.”

[via dangerous minds]