Art without Education

As artists, curators, and writers, we are increasingly forced to market ourselves by developing a consistent product, a concise presentation, a statement that can be communicated in thirty seconds or less—and oftentimes this alone passes for professionalism. For emerging artists and curators there is an ever-increasing number of well-intentioned programs that essentially indoctrinate them into becoming content providers for an art system whose values and welfare are wholly defined by its own logic of supply and demand.

Anton Vidokle, Art without Market, Art without Education: Political Economy of Art, 2013

Oh Dracula

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In 1974, at the Utah Museum of Art in Salt Lake City, Chris Burden climbed into a “chrysalis”-like sac and had himself installed in between some of the museum’s exceedingly random 18th century paintings, with candles placed at his head and feet. And there he hid all day.

[via]

Nick Cave and The Museum of Important Shit

nickcave-movie

“Nick Cave, the musician best known for his work with The Bad Seeds, was inspired to help create this online museum during the filming of his quasi-autobiographical documentary 20,000 Days on Earth. Cave, along with directors Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard, began thinking about the nature of memorabilia, inspired by his own experience at a Nina Simone performance of yesteryear and a wad of chewing gum.”

More here.

Ways of Something

18_Eva-Papamargariti

Ways of Something”, is a contemporary remake of John Berger’s BBC documentary, “Ways of Seeing” (1972). Commissioned by The One Minutes, at the Sandberg Instituut in Amsterdam and compiled by Lorna Mills, the project consists of one-minute videos by fifty eight web-based artists who commonly work with 3D rendering, gifs, film remix, webcam performances, and websites to describe the cacophonous conditions of artmaking after the internet.
Watch the online premiere of the first part here.