Camera Obscura on Manhattan

“Most of Abelardo Morell’s photographs are digital, but a lot of his gear is, conceptually, a millennium old. Morell is among the few contemporary masters of the camera obscura, the ancient method of projecting an image on a wall (deployed by Renaissance masters, like Leonardo da Vinci, and possibly used as a painting aid). All it is, really, is a room with a tiny hole in the wall or roof that acts as a lens.”

[read more on nymag]

Off

Off is a photo series by Johan Rosenmunthe:

“In ’Off’ the persons are only visible through a digital representation, while the surroundings are as analog as possible. These pixelated persons are isolated from the rest of the world and often find themselves in foggy, strange milieus.”


Long exposure photographs of videogames

Long exposure photographs of videogames by Rosemarie Fiore:

“These photographs are long exposures taken while playing video war games of the 80’s created by Atari, Centuri and Taito. The photographs were shot from video game screens while I played the games. By recording each second of an entire game on one frame of film, I captured complex patterns not normally seen by the eye.”

[via kottke]

Totems

Totems is a photo project by Alain Delorme:

“Alain Delorme offers a very singular vision of China in the days leading to the World Expo in his new Totems series. This work is the result of two residencies in Shanghai, supported by the Ailing Foundation. It shows the photographer’s fascination for migrants’ pressures. Piles of products labeled “Made in China” are stacked up to produce quite unusual sculptures, symbols of the Chineses’ a ever increasing fetish withobjects.”

You, the World and I

You, the World and I: new video work by Jon Rafman. A voice over essay about love, memory, photography, technology, and our experience of the world.

“In this modern day Orphean tale, an anonymous narrator also desperately searches for a lost love.  Rather than the charms of the lyre, contemporary technological tools, Google Street View and Google Earth, beckon as the pathway for our narrator to regain memories and recapture traces of his lost love. In the film, they are as captivating and enthralling as charming as any lyre in retrieving the other: at first they might seem an open retort to critics of new technology who bemoan the lack of the tangible presence of the other in our interactions on the Internet.” (full statement here).

[p.s. this is another work that will be shown in Maps and Legends, my forthcoming exhibition during FotoGrafia Festival. Come and have a look if you’re in Rome from September 23th to October 24th]

Multitasking

“Right now a torrent of moments is rushing past you that you will never, ever experience again. Isn’t it time that you reach out your arms and grab them before they slip away? As connectivity evolves into a human right, what you wear could affect how you see the past, what will happen in your future, and most crucially: how immediately you’re seizing the present. A global trend is in effect: read, record, repeat, plug in, log on, text up, tune in, drop out.”

on DIS magazine

The Longest Photographic Exposures in History

“The German photography artist Michael Wesely has created these long exposures photos using a self-built pinhole camera. He captured the light of his objects for up to 3 years.
In 2001 he was invited by the Museum of Modern Art in New York to use his unique technique to record the re-development of their building. He set up four cameras in four different corners and photographed the destruction and re-building of the MoMa until 2004 – leaving the shutter (the holes) open for up to 34 months.

[via neatorama and the iphone photo blog]

Destroy infinite value

“In this work I want to bring the concept how a digital photograph can be duplicated endlessly to a more physical understanding. Therefor I used 3 of the same photographic prints on top of eachother in a frame. (similar to the way Layers function in Photoshop software ) It was a joy to know that the picture would still stay complete while taking parts out with a knife. While at the same time the prints got even more unique and gained more value as an art piece.”

(work by Anne de Vries)

Photography and New Media

Good News! As you might have read somewhere in the press, I’ve been selected as a guest curator for the next three editions of FotoGrafia Festival Internazionale di Roma regarding the section “photography and new media”. The other two curators are Paul Wombell (photography and contemporary art) and Marc Prust (photography and publishing). FotoGrafia, international festival in Rome, is promoted by Comune di Roma and MACRO, produced by Zoneattive, director Marco Delogu.

I’m totally open to suggestions, so if you are aware of any interesting work involving the relationship between photography and new media, please drop me a line here:
valentina.tanni AT gmail.com

My Newspaper

My Newspaper is an art project by photographer Ivars Gravlejs:

“The project was realized during one year while I was working as a photoreporter in one of the main daily Czech newspapers – Deník. Everyday from photo editors and journalists I got several assignments to photograph events around Prague. Before sending photographs to the newspaper’s Photobank I quickly manipulated them in Photoshop. Originally idea was to change some little, unimportant details where the manipulation wouldn’t change much the content of the photograph, for example, adding some more buttons on writer’s Zdenek Mahler T-shirt or painting inscription – „Cunt“ on the brick wall. Although during the process it happened to make some more radical ones, for example, creating a traffic jam on the highway or cutting of singer’s José Carreras finger. The aim of this project was to make an absurd, nonsense manipulation over the media manipulations.”

[via i heart photograph]

Unfamiliar systems

Anne Hardy

“I usually start with abandoned objects I find in the street. All the old science equipment here came from a school. I put a lot of specific things into the image, without making specific references, so people can bring different things to it. There is no single explanation. I wanted to create the feeling that there are unfamiliar systems at work here. For example, maybe it was reasonable for someone to label the sections of a basketball.”

Photos by Anne Hardy

The Airport Graveyard

airport graveyard

“I thought it was a mirage the first time I saw it. I was driving through the wastes of the Mojave Desert, two hours from anywhere, when off in the shimmering distance appeared the silhouettes of a hundred parked jetliners. I pulled off and tried to get closer to them, but a mean-looking perimeter fence keeps onlookers far away. All I could do was stand and stare, wondering what the hell this massive armada of airplanes was doing here, silently baking in the 110 degree heat. For years afterward I’d ask people what they knew about it, and I kept hearing the same thing: the place has been on lockdown since 9/11, and they won’t let civilians anywhere near the boneyard.”

[read more here]