The Internet Baboons

Photographers G.K. and Vikki Hart have something to teach about copyright and remix in the Internet age: “Yes, it would be nice if they made more money, but to make people laugh and for people to take it and use it their own way… you just can’t buy that

Ways of Something

18_Eva-Papamargariti

Ways of Something”, is a contemporary remake of John Berger’s BBC documentary, “Ways of Seeing” (1972). Commissioned by The One Minutes, at the Sandberg Instituut in Amsterdam and compiled by Lorna Mills, the project consists of one-minute videos by fifty eight web-based artists who commonly work with 3D rendering, gifs, film remix, webcam performances, and websites to describe the cacophonous conditions of artmaking after the internet.
Watch the online premiere of the first part here.

Allergy to Originality

Allergy to Originality, a short movie about “plagiarism, literary debt, appropriation, incorporation, retelling, rewriting, recapitulation, revision, reprise, thematic creation, ironic retake, parody, imitation, stylistic debt, pastiches, collages, and deliberate assemblages.”

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A Hole in Space

A Hole in Space LA-NY, 1980 – Artists Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz created a ‘hole in space,’ or what they described as a telecollaborative project that utilized satellites to stream true-to-life-scale video feeds between public spaces on either coast or large scale monitors, this was 30 some odd years before any of this became standard. The following is a video tape document of an unannounced, live two-way satellite transmission which took place between Los Angelese and New York city on November 12, 13 and 14, 1980 for two hours.

An open letter to Apple

“an open letter to Apple + experimental prosumer manifesto on the issues of planned obsolescence, upgrade culture, technological self-reliance, control and copying. A [re]mix/make of Phil Morton’s 1976 video tape ‘General Motors’, in which contemporary Chicago [dirty] new media artists explain their love && hate relationship with the ‘default art computer’. by Nick Briz, copy<it>right 2013″

Installation Art: Who Cares?

“The maintenance and conservation of contemporary visual art is a new challenge for museums and art conservators. More and more artists have taken leave of the painter’s brushes and are moving on to new media, such as video. Or they are making installations of transient materials like polystyrene, wax and scotch tape. Can these works be saved for the art lovers of the future?”