Nick Cave and The Museum of Important Shit

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“Nick Cave, the musician best known for his work with The Bad Seeds, was inspired to help create this online museum during the filming of his quasi-autobiographical documentary 20,000 Days on Earth. Cave, along with directors Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard, began thinking about the nature of memorabilia, inspired by his own experience at a Nina Simone performance of yesteryear and a wad of chewing gum.”

More here.

Ways of Something

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Ways of Something”, is a contemporary remake of John Berger’s BBC documentary, “Ways of Seeing” (1972). Commissioned by The One Minutes, at the Sandberg Instituut in Amsterdam and compiled by Lorna Mills, the project consists of one-minute videos by fifty eight web-based artists who commonly work with 3D rendering, gifs, film remix, webcam performances, and websites to describe the cacophonous conditions of artmaking after the internet.
Watch the online premiere of the first part here.

Allergy to Originality

Allergy to Originality, a short movie about “plagiarism, literary debt, appropriation, incorporation, retelling, rewriting, recapitulation, revision, reprise, thematic creation, ironic retake, parody, imitation, stylistic debt, pastiches, collages, and deliberate assemblages.”

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3D Marcel Duchamp Chess Set

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“Readymake: Duchamp Chess Set is a 3D-printed chess set generated from an archival photograph of Marcel Duchamp’s own custom and hand-carved game. His original physical set no longer exists. We have resurrected the lost artifact by digitally recreating it, and then making the 3D files available for anyone to print.”

Readymake: Duchamp Chess Set is a project by Scott Kildall and Bryan Cera

Andy Warhol works discovered on floppy disks

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“A multi-institutional team of new-media artists, computer experts, and museum professionals have discovered a dozen previously unknown experiments by Andy Warhol (BFA, 1949) on aging floppy disks from 1985. The purely digital images, “trapped” for nearly 30 years on Amiga® floppy disks stored in the archives collection of The Andy Warhol Museum (AWM), were discovered and extracted by members of the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU)Computer Club, with assistance from the AWM’s staff, CMU’s Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry (FRSCI), theHillman Photography Initiative at the Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA), and New York based artist Cory Arcangel.”

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