Life through the screen

“In a story that plays out entirely on a teenager’s computer screen, Noah follows its eponymous protagonist as his relationship takes a rapid turn for the worse in this fascinating study of behaviour (and romance) in the digital age.”

The Time Machine in alphabetical order

The Time Machine in alphabetical order, by Thomson & Craighead:

“The Time Machine in alphabetical order is a complete rendition of the 1960’s film version of HG Wells Novella re-edited by us into alphabetical order from beginning to end. In doing so, we attempt to perform a kind of time travel on the movie’s original time line through the use of a system of classification.”

[via vvork]

I’m Here

I’m Here” is a robot love story celebrating a life enriched by creativity. The movie is set in contemporary L.A., where life moves at a seemingly regular pace with the exception of a certain amount of robot residents who love among the population.

The short film is directed by Spike Jonze and sponsored by Absolut Vodka. Watch it here.

Disconnected

Disconnected

“Three college students take on the challenge of giving up their computers to see how their academic, social, and work lives are affected. No Facebook. No YouTube. No e-mail. How will they get their work done? Will they cheat? Who will survive the longest? This one-hour documentary follows Carleton College students Andrew, Caitlin, and Chel as they go through “digital detox” and learn to interact with themselves and with others in ways we have largely forgotten.”

Disconnected!

3D and the Reinassance

Avatar

According to art critic Jonathan Jones, James Cameron’s new 3D film Avatar has something to teach us about the Renaissance:

“In the 15th century, artists discovered how to paint bodies and landscapes as if they had depth and solidity. Painting triumphed over the flat surface to create the illusion of a real scene glimpsed through the square enclosure of the wooden panel or canvas, as if you were watching a play on a stage. The effect was just as dazzling, just as unexpected as 3D cinema – and it has lasted a lot longer than the gimmicks of 1950s science fiction.”

[read more]

Death & The Art World



“Isle of the Dead
has a pretty simple plot line:  the credit crisis kills the art world and its players, who reemerge as zombies in an alternative movement inspired only by art from the past. The film begins with sweeping shots of dead bodies splayed out in front of the Met, Guggenheim, and Whitney museums, plus a strip of galleries in Chelsea, and ends with a zombie uprising on Governors Island, where the zombies congregate for a sing-along to the Bryan Adams classic, “Summer of ‘69.”
The movie is an art project coordinated between Creative Time and The Bruce High Quality Foundation, and it’s playing in an old movie theater on Governors Island all summer.

Heaven and Hell

“Sweeney Todd” is a fable about a world from which the possibility of justice has vanished, replaced on one hand by vain and arbitrary power, on the other by a righteous fury that quickly spirals into madness. There may be a suggestion of hopefulness near the end, but you don’t see hope on the screen. What you see is as dark as the grave. What you hear — some of the finest stage music of the past 40 years — is equally infernal, except that you might just as well call it heavenly.”

[A. O. Scott sul NYTimes]

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