Lincoln 3D Scans

Cyril-Marble-boy

“For a project called “Lincoln 3D Scans,” artist Oliver Laric worked with the Collection Museum and Usher Gallery in Lincoln, UK, to make some of their pieces available in just that way. Laric sorted through their archives and chose dozens of objects to scan, from busts of Beethoven, Dante, and Einstein to pieces of furniture to a human pelvis bone. He then created 3D models of the objects, which he collected and published online. Each of the 52 pieces on Laric’s site — which is currently being highlighted as a “First Look” online exhibition by the New Museum — is presented in the form of a rotating GIF, stripped of color and looking like a kind of digital styrofoam version of itself. Underneath the GIFs are some basic identifying details and a button to download the scan as an STL file. Using that file, you can print the object yourself.”

[read more here]

Museum Minutes

“In cooperation with Gemeentemuseum The Hague, the Kunsthal Rotterdam proudly presents Museum Minutes, an exhibition in which visitors are tempted into spending longer looking at art. The aim of the exhibition is to extend the average time that museum visitors spend looking at individual artworks (currently 9 seconds). A remarkable total installation presents an amazing collection of artworks exhibited in such a way that visitors can experience them in a more intensive fashion.”

[via rebelart]

Blitz

Blitz, a performance by Marcello Maloberti for MACRO (Museum of Contemporary Art Rome).

King Philip IV of Spain autograph signing

From “the prank collective” Improv Everywhere: King Philip IV of Spain autograph signing:

“For our latest mission we staged an unauthorized autograph signing in the Metropolitan Museum of Art with an actor who bears a striking resemblance to King Philip IV of Spain. Standing in front of the 400-year-old Velázquez painting, the “King” greeted museum patrons and offered free signed 8×10 photos.”

Re: work of art

“An invitation was sent to a group of artists. I provided a curated list of works from SFMOMA’s permanent collection and asked each artist to make a work in response. This assignment continues my exploration as to how others interact with the museum, particularly how artists relate to works in the permanent collection.” (Brion Nuda Rosch)

http://blog.sfmoma.org/2010/06/reresponse-partone

Chris Collins “24 Hour Psycho Re-Created as iPhoto Slideshow (2010) [Excerpt]” in response to

Douglas Gordon “Pretty much every film and video work from about 1992 until now. To be seen on monitors, some with headphones, others run silently and all simultaneously.” 1992-2012

Guggenheim & Youtube

YouTube Play. A Biennial of Creative Video aims to discover and showcase the most exceptional talent working in the ever-expanding realm of online video. Developed by YouTube and the Guggenheim Museum in collaboration with HP, YouTube Play hopes to attract innovative, original, and surprising videos from around the world, regardless of genre, technique, background, or budget. This global online initiative is not a search for what’s “now,” but a search for what’s next. Visit youtube.com/play to learn more and submit a video.

The dream museum

For the building’s 50th anniversary, the Guggenheim Museum invited nearly two hundred artists, architects, and designers to imagine their dream interventions in the space for the exhibition Contemplating the Void: Interventions in the Guggenheim Museum. Some of them look amazing…

The Fox in the Museum

Francis Alys, Nightwatch

In 2004, Francis Alÿs collaborated with the National Portrait Gallery to create a piece generated by the gallery’s state-of-the-art internal CCTV system. Surveillance cameras observe a fox exploring the Tudor and Georgian rooms of the Gallery at night…

(Theoretically) destroying the museum



Samson
(1985) is an artwork by Chris Burden. In his words: “a museum installation consisting of a 100 ton jack connected to a gear box and a turnstile. The 100 ton jack pushes two large timbers against the bearing walls of the museum. Each visitor to the exhibition must pass through the turnstile in order to see the exhibition. Each input on the turnstile ever so slightly expands the jack, and ultimately, if enough people visit the exhibition, Samson could theoretically destroy the building. Like a glacier its powerful movement is imperceptible to the naked eye. This sculptural installation subverts the notion of the sanctity of the museum (the shed that houses art).”

video

[via today and tomorrow]