Lincoln 3D Scans

Cyril-Marble-boy

“For a project called “Lincoln 3D Scans,” artist Oliver Laric worked with the Collection Museum and Usher Gallery in Lincoln, UK, to make some of their pieces available in just that way. Laric sorted through their archives and chose dozens of objects to scan, from busts of Beethoven, Dante, and Einstein to pieces of furniture to a human pelvis bone. He then created 3D models of the objects, which he collected and published online. Each of the 52 pieces on Laric’s site — which is currently being highlighted as a “First Look” online exhibition by the New Museum — is presented in the form of a rotating GIF, stripped of color and looking like a kind of digital styrofoam version of itself. Underneath the GIFs are some basic identifying details and a button to download the scan as an STL file. Using that file, you can print the object yourself.”

[read more here]

Museum Minutes

“In cooperation with Gemeentemuseum The Hague, the Kunsthal Rotterdam proudly presents Museum Minutes, an exhibition in which visitors are tempted into spending longer looking at art. The aim of the exhibition is to extend the average time that museum visitors spend looking at individual artworks (currently 9 seconds). A remarkable total installation presents an amazing collection of artworks exhibited in such a way that visitors can experience them in a more intensive fashion.”

[via rebelart]

Blitz

Blitz, a performance by Marcello Maloberti for MACRO (Museum of Contemporary Art Rome).

King Philip IV of Spain autograph signing

From “the prank collective” Improv Everywhere: King Philip IV of Spain autograph signing:

“For our latest mission we staged an unauthorized autograph signing in the Metropolitan Museum of Art with an actor who bears a striking resemblance to King Philip IV of Spain. Standing in front of the 400-year-old Velázquez painting, the “King” greeted museum patrons and offered free signed 8×10 photos.”

Guggenheim & Youtube

YouTube Play. A Biennial of Creative Video aims to discover and showcase the most exceptional talent working in the ever-expanding realm of online video. Developed by YouTube and the Guggenheim Museum in collaboration with HP, YouTube Play hopes to attract innovative, original, and surprising videos from around the world, regardless of genre, technique, background, or budget. This global online initiative is not a search for what’s “now,” but a search for what’s next. Visit youtube.com/play to learn more and submit a video.