Nick Cave and The Museum of Important Shit

nickcave-movie

“Nick Cave, the musician best known for his work with The Bad Seeds, was inspired to help create this online museum during the filming of his quasi-autobiographical documentary 20,000 Days on Earth. Cave, along with directors Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard, began thinking about the nature of memorabilia, inspired by his own experience at a Nina Simone performance of yesteryear and a wad of chewing gum.”

More here.

Ways of Something

18_Eva-Papamargariti

Ways of Something”, is a contemporary remake of John Berger’s BBC documentary, “Ways of Seeing” (1972). Commissioned by The One Minutes, at the Sandberg Instituut in Amsterdam and compiled by Lorna Mills, the project consists of one-minute videos by fifty eight web-based artists who commonly work with 3D rendering, gifs, film remix, webcam performances, and websites to describe the cacophonous conditions of artmaking after the internet.
Watch the online premiere of the first part here.

3D Marcel Duchamp Chess Set

duchamp3dchess

“Readymake: Duchamp Chess Set is a 3D-printed chess set generated from an archival photograph of Marcel Duchamp’s own custom and hand-carved game. His original physical set no longer exists. We have resurrected the lost artifact by digitally recreating it, and then making the 3D files available for anyone to print.”

Readymake: Duchamp Chess Set is a project by Scott Kildall and Bryan Cera

Andy Warhol works discovered on floppy disks

warhol warhol2

“A multi-institutional team of new-media artists, computer experts, and museum professionals have discovered a dozen previously unknown experiments by Andy Warhol (BFA, 1949) on aging floppy disks from 1985. The purely digital images, “trapped” for nearly 30 years on Amiga® floppy disks stored in the archives collection of The Andy Warhol Museum (AWM), were discovered and extracted by members of the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU)Computer Club, with assistance from the AWM’s staff, CMU’s Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry (FRSCI), theHillman Photography Initiative at the Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA), and New York based artist Cory Arcangel.”

[via]

A Hole in Space

A Hole in Space LA-NY, 1980 – Artists Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz created a ‘hole in space,’ or what they described as a telecollaborative project that utilized satellites to stream true-to-life-scale video feeds between public spaces on either coast or large scale monitors, this was 30 some odd years before any of this became standard. The following is a video tape document of an unannounced, live two-way satellite transmission which took place between Los Angelese and New York city on November 12, 13 and 14, 1980 for two hours.

Iconic History

screenshot-half

Iconic history is a Chrome extension by Shan Huang that visualizes your browser history as a favicon stack. It creates a favicon for each url visited, and compiles all icons into a huge sequence based on access time. See interactive demo here.

Lincoln 3D Scans

Cyril-Marble-boy

“For a project called “Lincoln 3D Scans,” artist Oliver Laric worked with the Collection Museum and Usher Gallery in Lincoln, UK, to make some of their pieces available in just that way. Laric sorted through their archives and chose dozens of objects to scan, from busts of Beethoven, Dante, and Einstein to pieces of furniture to a human pelvis bone. He then created 3D models of the objects, which he collected and published online. Each of the 52 pieces on Laric’s site — which is currently being highlighted as a “First Look” online exhibition by the New Museum — is presented in the form of a rotating GIF, stripped of color and looking like a kind of digital styrofoam version of itself. Underneath the GIFs are some basic identifying details and a button to download the scan as an STL file. Using that file, you can print the object yourself.”

[read more here]

Artomat

artomat

“ARTOMAT is a system for the automated production of art. Select an object, apply certain methods to it, combine it with another object, place it in an appropriate space, and your unique work is ready!
In our era, there are evermore products, both material and virtual, that are created entirely or to a large extent through automated processes. Art is the last bastion where one-off, unique products are made. What’s more, they are linked to the myth of the individual “internal world of the artist.” Nevertheless, if we closely observe the processes that have been underway in art in recent decades, we can see that behind the apparent variety in the works that are appearing lies a fairly limited selection of algorithms employed in their creation:

— taking something small and powerfully magnifying it;
— taking a single object and multiplying it;
— taking a large object and turning it upside down;
— building a recognizable object from “inappropriate,” paradoxical materials, or covering it in a strange pattern or colour;
— taking two or more objects from different, unconnected contexts and combining them;
— recombination — deconstruction with subsequent “inappropriate” assembly.

The ARTOMAT works by employing algorithms akin to those given above and generating art in an automated or semiautomated mode. The viewer becomes a user-artist, creating genuine works of art to suit his or her own taste. Hooked
up to a 2D or 3D printer, the ARTOMAT allows material objects to be created — pictures and sculptures. Thus, the entire production cycle for the creation of the work is automated, from conception to realization.”

ARTOMAT is a project by Aristarkh Chernyshev and Alexei Shulgin, 2013. See a gallery here.