#songsincode

songsincode

songsincode tries to display either a title of a song or part of its lyrics (as some songs are more known by the refrain than their title – for example there is no such thing as “all the lonely people” by The Beatles) in code. This could be PHP, JavaScript or any other language…”

This Title is an Artwork of Mine

Pind

This is the first thing I saw arriving in Copenhagen. We were just strolling around the city, when I saw the Overgaden Gallery sign and decided to take a look. Established in 1986 by a group of local artists, Overgaden is a really interesting no-profit space for contemporary art, with a program of ten exhibition per year. Currently they are working on the new one, but last week I managed to see an amazing solo show by Pind, a young danish artist. His works plays tricks on the visitor’s mind, calling into question our sense of consciousness, perception, and reality itself…

I create you – you create me. I recognise myself in your thoughts, and you recognise yourself in mine. In this way, we mutually confirm our existence towards each other. (Pind)

press realease and photos
exhibition folder (pdf)

The Nine Eyes of Google Street View

Google Street View Camera

This is a must-read. Artist Jon Rafman has written a wonderful essay on Google Street View for Art Fag City:

“One year ago, I started collecting screen captures of Google Street Views from a range of Street View blogs and through my own hunting. This essay illustrates how my Street View collections reflect the excitement of exploring this new, virtual world. The world captured by Google appears to be more truthful and more transparent because of the weight accorded to external reality, the perception of a neutral, unbiased recording, and even the vastness of the project. At the same time, I acknowledge that this way of photographing creates a cultural text like any other, a structured and structuring space whose codes and meaning the artist and the curator of the images can assist in constructing or deciphering.”

read more here
full project here

A structural conceit

Mike Nelson

I’m back in Rome after a short trip to Denmark and Sweden (here you can find the full photo album). I saw a lot of interesting stuff that I’m gonna report in the next few posts. Starting with the best of course: Mike Nelson‘s exhibition at Statens Museum for Kunst in Copenhagen. The installation occupies a whole floor of the museum with a labyrinthine and replicating series of rooms. The experience of walking through this work is really hard to explain: it begins with curiosity and fun, than leads to disorientation and anxiety, ending in total amazement. Nelson explains the project in a series of video-interviews you can watch here. And this is an effective description of the work:

Mike Nelson

“Two rooms exactly the same, connected by one long rectangular one in the middle. The structure I’m building is then flipped onto the other side and mirrored with a big curved 120-foot-long corridor in the middle. In a sense you see the back of a structure, the falsity of what you’re walking into, almost like you’ve come to the back of a show when you shouldn’t have done. Initially you’re feeling kind of pleased with yourself because you spoiled the artist’s trick. This however is a double bluff of sorts as it relaxes you for the main feature which is your passage through the curved corridor back to the same space where everything is reversed. It looks kind of the same but you know it’s not, so there’s an uncanniness, an unease about it. It’s like an investigation of your own recent history, a device to reinvent that sense of deja-vu the first time you ever experienced it as a child, an existential moment of confusion.”
(Mike Nelson interviewed by Michele Robecchi)

Pseudo-Documentary

Glass

You look at the photos and think “wow, what a spectacular installation”, maybe a little too crafty, but beautiful nonetheless. Then you realize something is missing. And slowly understand that it’s reality itself…
Pseudo-documentary is a photo series by David DiMichele, and depicts fantasy installations in monumental exhibition spaces. As we read in his gallery website: “DiMichele creates this work by first building scale models of exhibition spaces, and producing original artworks in drawing, painting and sculpture mediums, which are sited in the spaces and then photographed to create the final works.”

Death & The Art World



“Isle of the Dead
has a pretty simple plot line:  the credit crisis kills the art world and its players, who reemerge as zombies in an alternative movement inspired only by art from the past. The film begins with sweeping shots of dead bodies splayed out in front of the Met, Guggenheim, and Whitney museums, plus a strip of galleries in Chelsea, and ends with a zombie uprising on Governors Island, where the zombies congregate for a sing-along to the Bryan Adams classic, “Summer of ‘69.”
The movie is an art project coordinated between Creative Time and The Bruce High Quality Foundation, and it’s playing in an old movie theater on Governors Island all summer.

Doorbell with inbuilt visitor statistics display « Variations on normal by Dominic Wilcox

Source: variationsonnormal.com
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