FOMO: The Fear of Missing Out

lund

The Fear Of Missing Out” is a project by Jonas Lund:

“The title derives from a social network induced anxiety condition. One brought on by trying to keep up with a rapidly moving world. A fear of constantly being one-step behind, in the wrong place, and missing out on the most exciting events. The Fear Of Missing Out proposes that it is possible to be one step ahead of the art world by using well-crafted algorithms and computational logic.

The works in the show are the result of a computer algorithm written by Lund. By analysing and categorizing a wide range of artworks, by the most successful contemporary artists, a set of instructions were generated explaining, step by step, how to make the most successful works of art. The artist then simply made the work following the instructions. In The Fear of Missing Out, important categories from the art world such as authenticity, artistry, talent, and creativity are questioned. The title also refers to the urge to be a part of a transparent information society made up of an overarching digital network.”

It looks like typing

“There is an aesthetic crisis in writing, which is this: how do we write emotionally of scenes involving computers? How do we make concrete, or at least reconstructable in the minds of our readers, the terrible, true passions that cross telephony lines? Right now my field must tackle describing a world where falling in love, going to war and filling out tax forms looks the same; it looks like typing.”

Quinn Norton

[via dayofthedreamweavers]

Annals of Time Lost

rafman

“The conversation surrounding the presentation and archival of new media art has often revolved around the issues facing curators and historians as they struggle to bring older works to newer formats; in Annals of Time Lost, Jon Rafman reframes this responsibility into an opportunity: A COPEX LD75D microfiche reader displays Rafman’s New Age Demanded, a series of busts rendered from 3D models; while a nearby plinth houses a 3D print of a bust from the same series. The conditions of archival anxiety—which has been, on some level, wrongly understood as a passing phase to a future in which Google Glass sees all—become palpable as Rafman reexamines the scale and physicality of archives.”

Jon Rafman
Annals of Time Lost
Future Gallery
Berlin, Germany

[via dismagazine]

Media Burn: the ultimate media event

Media Burn integrates performance, spectacle and media critique, as Ant Farm stages an explosive collusion of two of America’s most potent cultural symbols: the automobile and television. On July 4, 1975, at San Francisco’s Cow Palace, Ant Farm presented what they termed the “ultimate media event.” In this alternative Bicentennial celebration, a “Phantom Dream Car”—a reconstructed 1959 El Dorado Cadillac convertible—was driven through a wall of burning TV sets.”

more documentation here

Media-Burn-by-Ant-Farm ant_01 ant_05