Chrono-Cubism

The work of Brazilian photographer Diego Kuffer:

“Photography only lets you capture instants (even long exposures are only blurred instants). So, I hacked the idea of photography, mixing together many photos of the same scene into a single one, slicing and dicing the images and putting them back together, chronologically. I call the grammar behind it ‘chrono cubism.'”

[via boing boing]

Camera Obscura on Manhattan

“Most of Abelardo Morell’s photographs are digital, but a lot of his gear is, conceptually, a millennium old. Morell is among the few contemporary masters of the camera obscura, the ancient method of projecting an image on a wall (deployed by Renaissance masters, like Leonardo da Vinci, and possibly used as a painting aid). All it is, really, is a room with a tiny hole in the wall or roof that acts as a lens.”

[read more on nymag]

Off

Off is a photo series by Johan Rosenmunthe:

“In ’Off’ the persons are only visible through a digital representation, while the surroundings are as analog as possible. These pixelated persons are isolated from the rest of the world and often find themselves in foggy, strange milieus.”


Long exposure photographs of videogames

Long exposure photographs of videogames by Rosemarie Fiore:

“These photographs are long exposures taken while playing video war games of the 80’s created by Atari, Centuri and Taito. The photographs were shot from video game screens while I played the games. By recording each second of an entire game on one frame of film, I captured complex patterns not normally seen by the eye.”

[via kottke]

Totems

Totems is a photo project by Alain Delorme:

“Alain Delorme offers a very singular vision of China in the days leading to the World Expo in his new Totems series. This work is the result of two residencies in Shanghai, supported by the Ailing Foundation. It shows the photographer’s fascination for migrants’ pressures. Piles of products labeled “Made in China” are stacked up to produce quite unusual sculptures, symbols of the Chineses’ a ever increasing fetish withobjects.”

You, the World and I

You, the World and I: new video work by Jon Rafman. A voice over essay about love, memory, photography, technology, and our experience of the world.

“In this modern day Orphean tale, an anonymous narrator also desperately searches for a lost love.  Rather than the charms of the lyre, contemporary technological tools, Google Street View and Google Earth, beckon as the pathway for our narrator to regain memories and recapture traces of his lost love. In the film, they are as captivating and enthralling as charming as any lyre in retrieving the other: at first they might seem an open retort to critics of new technology who bemoan the lack of the tangible presence of the other in our interactions on the Internet.” (full statement here).

[p.s. this is another work that will be shown in Maps and Legends, my forthcoming exhibition during FotoGrafia Festival. Come and have a look if you’re in Rome from September 23th to October 24th]