Lifespan

Lifespan

Claire Healy & Sean Cordeiro, Lifespan, Installation, 2009.
175, 218 VHS video cassettes are arranged to form a solid block in the deconsecrated chapel of a former nunnery. The combined running time of these cassettes, if played consecutively, would be 60.1 years, the average human life span in 1976 – the year that the VHS was released.

Medusa

Medusa

A brand new street installation by Laura Keeble (remember the famous Hirst’s skull prank?). Now Versace has to deal with Medusa in person…

“The installation of Medusa outside the Versace store was to discuss the ownership of Medusa by the fashion house. A relationship between the single Versace mannequin within the store shopfront and Medusa also reflected the acceptance of what is beautiful and the outcasting of what is deemed ugly, by those that consider themselves an authority. Medusa with her shopping bags turned to stone by the very horror that is herself reflected in the use and ownership of an ancient icon to sell goods.”

[via wooster collective]

Turning the Place Over

Turning the Place Over

Turning the Place Over is Richard Wilson’s most radical intervention into architecture to date, turning a building in Liverpool’s city centre literally inside out. The artwork was a commission for the Liverpool 2008 Biennial.
Turning the Place Over consists of an 8 metres diameter ovoid cut from the façade of a building in Liverpool city centre and made to oscillate in three dimensions. The revolving façade rests on a specially designed giant rotator, usually used in the shipping and nuclear industries, and acts as a huge opening and closing ‘window’, offering recurrent glimpses of the interior during its constant cycle during daylight hours.

[via todayandtomorrow]

The Tree

Sebastian Errazuriz, The Tree
The Tree (2006), is an artwork by Sebastian Errazuriz:

“A 10-meter high, real magnolia tree planted in the center of Chile’s National Stadium where dictator Pinochet tortured political prisoners 30 years ago. For a week the stadium was open to the public as a park. A soccer match played before 15,000 people, with the tree in the middle, was the closure of the piece.”

[via iheartmyart]

This Title is an Artwork of Mine

Pind

This is the first thing I saw arriving in Copenhagen. We were just strolling around the city, when I saw the Overgaden Gallery sign and decided to take a look. Established in 1986 by a group of local artists, Overgaden is a really interesting no-profit space for contemporary art, with a program of ten exhibition per year. Currently they are working on the new one, but last week I managed to see an amazing solo show by Pind, a young danish artist. His works plays tricks on the visitor’s mind, calling into question our sense of consciousness, perception, and reality itself…

I create you – you create me. I recognise myself in your thoughts, and you recognise yourself in mine. In this way, we mutually confirm our existence towards each other. (Pind)

press realease and photos
exhibition folder (pdf)

A structural conceit

Mike Nelson

I’m back in Rome after a short trip to Denmark and Sweden (here you can find the full photo album). I saw a lot of interesting stuff that I’m gonna report in the next few posts. Starting with the best of course: Mike Nelson‘s exhibition at Statens Museum for Kunst in Copenhagen. The installation occupies a whole floor of the museum with a labyrinthine and replicating series of rooms. The experience of walking through this work is really hard to explain: it begins with curiosity and fun, than leads to disorientation and anxiety, ending in total amazement. Nelson explains the project in a series of video-interviews you can watch here. And this is an effective description of the work:

Mike Nelson

“Two rooms exactly the same, connected by one long rectangular one in the middle. The structure I’m building is then flipped onto the other side and mirrored with a big curved 120-foot-long corridor in the middle. In a sense you see the back of a structure, the falsity of what you’re walking into, almost like you’ve come to the back of a show when you shouldn’t have done. Initially you’re feeling kind of pleased with yourself because you spoiled the artist’s trick. This however is a double bluff of sorts as it relaxes you for the main feature which is your passage through the curved corridor back to the same space where everything is reversed. It looks kind of the same but you know it’s not, so there’s an uncanniness, an unease about it. It’s like an investigation of your own recent history, a device to reinvent that sense of deja-vu the first time you ever experienced it as a child, an existential moment of confusion.”
(Mike Nelson interviewed by Michele Robecchi)

Pseudo-Documentary

Glass

You look at the photos and think “wow, what a spectacular installation”, maybe a little too crafty, but beautiful nonetheless. Then you realize something is missing. And slowly understand that it’s reality itself…
Pseudo-documentary is a photo series by David DiMichele, and depicts fantasy installations in monumental exhibition spaces. As we read in his gallery website: “DiMichele creates this work by first building scale models of exhibition spaces, and producing original artworks in drawing, painting and sculpture mediums, which are sited in the spaces and then photographed to create the final works.”