Lincoln 3D Scans

Cyril-Marble-boy

“For a project called “Lincoln 3D Scans,” artist Oliver Laric worked with the Collection Museum and Usher Gallery in Lincoln, UK, to make some of their pieces available in just that way. Laric sorted through their archives and chose dozens of objects to scan, from busts of Beethoven, Dante, and Einstein to pieces of furniture to a human pelvis bone. He then created 3D models of the objects, which he collected and published online. Each of the 52 pieces on Laric’s site — which is currently being highlighted as a “First Look” online exhibition by the New Museum — is presented in the form of a rotating GIF, stripped of color and looking like a kind of digital styrofoam version of itself. Underneath the GIFs are some basic identifying details and a button to download the scan as an STL file. Using that file, you can print the object yourself.”

[read more here]

Artomat

artomat

“ARTOMAT is a system for the automated production of art. Select an object, apply certain methods to it, combine it with another object, place it in an appropriate space, and your unique work is ready!
In our era, there are evermore products, both material and virtual, that are created entirely or to a large extent through automated processes. Art is the last bastion where one-off, unique products are made. What’s more, they are linked to the myth of the individual “internal world of the artist.” Nevertheless, if we closely observe the processes that have been underway in art in recent decades, we can see that behind the apparent variety in the works that are appearing lies a fairly limited selection of algorithms employed in their creation:

— taking something small and powerfully magnifying it;
— taking a single object and multiplying it;
— taking a large object and turning it upside down;
— building a recognizable object from “inappropriate,” paradoxical materials, or covering it in a strange pattern or colour;
— taking two or more objects from different, unconnected contexts and combining them;
— recombination — deconstruction with subsequent “inappropriate” assembly.

The ARTOMAT works by employing algorithms akin to those given above and generating art in an automated or semiautomated mode. The viewer becomes a user-artist, creating genuine works of art to suit his or her own taste. Hooked
up to a 2D or 3D printer, the ARTOMAT allows material objects to be created — pictures and sculptures. Thus, the entire production cycle for the creation of the work is automated, from conception to realization.”

ARTOMAT is a project by Aristarkh Chernyshev and Alexei Shulgin, 2013. See a gallery here.

FOMO: The Fear of Missing Out

lund

The Fear Of Missing Out” is a project by Jonas Lund:

“The title derives from a social network induced anxiety condition. One brought on by trying to keep up with a rapidly moving world. A fear of constantly being one-step behind, in the wrong place, and missing out on the most exciting events. The Fear Of Missing Out proposes that it is possible to be one step ahead of the art world by using well-crafted algorithms and computational logic.

The works in the show are the result of a computer algorithm written by Lund. By analysing and categorizing a wide range of artworks, by the most successful contemporary artists, a set of instructions were generated explaining, step by step, how to make the most successful works of art. The artist then simply made the work following the instructions. In The Fear of Missing Out, important categories from the art world such as authenticity, artistry, talent, and creativity are questioned. The title also refers to the urge to be a part of a transparent information society made up of an overarching digital network.”

Annals of Time Lost

rafman

“The conversation surrounding the presentation and archival of new media art has often revolved around the issues facing curators and historians as they struggle to bring older works to newer formats; in Annals of Time Lost, Jon Rafman reframes this responsibility into an opportunity: A COPEX LD75D microfiche reader displays Rafman’s New Age Demanded, a series of busts rendered from 3D models; while a nearby plinth houses a 3D print of a bust from the same series. The conditions of archival anxiety—which has been, on some level, wrongly understood as a passing phase to a future in which Google Glass sees all—become palpable as Rafman reexamines the scale and physicality of archives.”

Jon Rafman
Annals of Time Lost
Future Gallery
Berlin, Germany

[via dismagazine]

Media Burn: the ultimate media event

Media Burn integrates performance, spectacle and media critique, as Ant Farm stages an explosive collusion of two of America’s most potent cultural symbols: the automobile and television. On July 4, 1975, at San Francisco’s Cow Palace, Ant Farm presented what they termed the “ultimate media event.” In this alternative Bicentennial celebration, a “Phantom Dream Car”—a reconstructed 1959 El Dorado Cadillac convertible—was driven through a wall of burning TV sets.”

more documentation here

Media-Burn-by-Ant-Farm ant_01 ant_05

On Anti-art

“Anti-art is art because it has entered into a dialectical dialogue with art, re-exposing contradictions that art has tried to conceal. To think that anti-art raises everything to the level of art is quite wrong. Anti-art exists only within the boundaries of art. Outside these boundaries it exists not as anti-art but as madness, bottle-racks and urinals”

(SMILE Magazine, 1985; quoted by Florian Cramer, in Anti-Media, 2013)

Dear Jennifer

dullart

Constant DullaartJennifer_in_Paradise, 2013. Re-distributed digital image, encrypted message.

“An image taken by John Knoll of his (at that time) soon to be wife, Jennifer. Together with his brother Thomas, John is know for developing Photoshop. Digitized by Kodak in 1987, it is the first known image to have been manipulated using the program. The image is newly distributed online, containing a steganographically encrypted payload.”

See also: A letter to Jennifer Knoll

[via]

Hyper Current Living

ryder ripps

Hyper Current Living is a performance by Ryder Ripps in which he “lives” and “works” at Red Bull Music Academy between April 28th and May 5th 2013 – he’ll be drinking Red Bull and creating digital stuff at hyper speed. In the stream, our output is valued by its proliferation and its likes and favs – what incentive is there to spend 4 years writing a novel if it will just be a link in a stream lasting a few hours? The piece brings this trait into light by designating a time and space to the creation of such fragmented, short interactions native to social media.”