56 Broken Kindle Screens

“56 Broken Kindle Screens” is a print on demand paperback that consists of found photos depicting broken Kindle screens. The Kindle is Amazon’s e-reading device which is by default connected to the company’s book store.

The book takes as its starting point the peculiar aesthetic of broken E Ink displays and serves as an examination into the reading device’s materiality. As the screens break, they become collages composed of different pages, cover illustrations and interface elements.

56 Broken Kindle Screens – Photographed E Ink, Collected Online, Printed On Demand
Silvio Lorusso and Sebastian Schmieg, 2012

More info here: silviolorusso.com/home/?project=56-broken-kindle-screens
and here: sebastianschmieg.com/56brokenkindlescreens/

[via collectthewwworld]

Is the Web Browser Replacing the Art Gallery?

“For the past 200 years, the gallery has been the home of new and cutting-edge art, a place where the art community can come together and share new ideas. But in this episode, we ask: is the web browser replacing the gallery as the best place to view amazing, cutting-edge art?!? In the era of the internet, you can view remarkable art from the comfort of your laptop. Accessible to virtually everyone, web art does away with the physical limitations of the gallery and makes impossibly cool art a part of our daily lives!”

Anhedonia

Aleksandra Domanovic, Anhedonia, 2007. Video

In psychology, anhedonia is an inability to experience satisfaction from normally pleasurable life events such as eating, exercise and social or sexual interaction. It was also supposed to be the original title of Annie Hall, but was considered unmarketable.”

[via collect]

______.jpg

Alan Belcher, “______.jpg”, 2012

“Alan Belcher has produced new work for this exhibition, a ceramic multiple edition. Known for his pioneering of the photo-object_ genre (artworks which fused the disciplines of photography and sculpture); he has furthered that exploration with a multiple series of what can be seen as perhaps the ultimate “photo-object”. Belcher has taken the ephemeral nature of the universal jpeg, and solidified its default icon into a standard image surrogate. The edition entitled “______.jpg” was fabricated in China, is a series of 125 pieces each signed and dated.” 25 Years of Talent at Marianne Boesky Gallery, curated by Michelle Grabner May 2 – Jun 16, 2012.

[via jockohomo]

Not Sure if Art

Aled Lewis, Post post-modern ironic art for a cynical world. 297 x 420 mm (11.7 x 16.5 in) 5 colour screen print on Sirio 350gsm. Signed, numbered edition of 50. Lovingly hand-made in London, England for the “Memes” group show

Art in the Era of the Internet

“The internet has intensified connections between people across the planet. In this episode we take a look at the impact of this new interconnectivity on the art world. Traditional funding models are dissolving, new forms of expressing ownership have arisen to accomodate for remix culture, and artists are finding ways to connect physical art experiences and traditions to the internet. In the digital era, the experience of art from the perspective of the artist and the art audience is shifting rapidly, and bringing more people into the creative process. “

The Twitter version of Marclay’s The Clock

“Nearly every second, a user on Twitter tweets about what time it is. It could be groaning about waking up, to telling a friend when to meet, to an automated train scheduler altering when the next one is coming. By searching Twitter for the current time we get a tiny glimpse of how active and far reaching the social network is.”

Actually, Chirp Clock makes much more sense that The Clock, a dull, overrated work that manages to impress us only for the giant amount of work and money necessary to make it (it’s really fun to watch, though).

[via kottke]

Blitz

Blitz, a performance by Marcello Maloberti for MACRO (Museum of Contemporary Art Rome).

Punishment

Punishment is a new series of works by Julius von Bismarck:

“The title of the exhibition points to a pre-Christian legend that says that the Achaemenid King and Egyptian Pharaoh Xerxes had the strait at Hellespont punished with 300 lashes, after bridges that had been built on his order were destroyed by a storm shortly after construction.
Julius von Bismarck took up this anger allegorically for his new series of works. From October to December 2011 he went on a journey through Switzerland, South America and the United States armed with a whip.  At impressive locations he plays with the rhetorical power of this traditional retaliation, whipping nature, defying its power, until he is exhausted. In a contemporary context, he thus rebels against socialization and, as a modern Sisyphus, questions value patterns which are conveyed to people today by societal constructs and authorities.”